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14 Travel Destinations For Evidence (Science) Based Leaders

The following article portrays 14 destinations for science based, or evidence based leaders.
If you know more destinations that would appeal to science fans, don’t hesitate to inform us using the comment buttons.

1. Museo Galileo in Florence, Italy

This museum famously houses Galileo’s personal instruments, as well as many artifacts from the 15th to 19th century, mostly pioneering scientific instruments. It also contains the thumb, index, and middle finger from Galileo’s right hand.

FLI  Evidence 1

Begun on March 4, 1588, and completed on May 6, 1593, this large armillary sphere was built under the supervision of Antonio Santucci at the request of Ferdinand I de’ Medici. The sphere represents the “universal machine” of the world according to the concepts developed by Aristotle and perfected by Ptolemy. The terrestrial globe is placed at the center. Surprisingly, it even displays territories that were still relatively little known at the time.

2. The Cabinet War Rooms in London, England

From 1939 to 1945, a group of basement offices in Whitehall served as the nerve centre of Britain’s war effort. Known as the Cabinet War Rooms, the complex was occupied by leading government ministers, military strategists and Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

From 1939 to 1945, a group of basement offices in Whitehall served as the nerve centre of Britain’s war effort. Known as the Cabinet War Rooms, the complex was occupied by leading government ministers, military strategists and Prime Minister Winston Churchill.

The Cabinet War Rooms are in an underground bunker that served as the British government command center during World War II. Located under the Whitehall area of Westminster, these secret rooms house incredible technology used during the war, including a code-scrambling, transatlantic telephone used for correspondence between Winston Churchill and the Pentagon.

3. Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum in Washington, D. C., USA

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum maintains the world’s largest and most significant collection of aviation and space artifacts, encompassing all aspects of human flight, as well as related works of art and archival materials.

FLI Evidence 6

The Smithsonian’s National Air and Space Museum operates two landmark facilities that, together, welcome more than eight million visitors a year, making it the most visited museum in the country. It also is home to the Center for Earth and Planetary Studies.

4.The Neil Armstrong Museum in Wapakoneta, Ohio, USA

The museum shares the story of Neil Armstrong, all Ohioans who have attempted to defy gravity, the Space Race, and current space exploration.  The museum’s architecture is designed to resemble a futuristic moon base. It is most beautiful when viewed at dusk.

FLI Evidence 7

The Armstrong Air & Space Museum features many one-of-a-kind artifacts including the Gemini VIII spacecraft, Neil Armstrong’s Gemini and Apollo spacesuits, and an Apollo 11 moon rock.

5. The Deutsches Museum in Munich, Germany

The Deutsches Museum possesses over 100 000 objects from the fields of science and technology. The large number of valuable original exhibits makes the Deutsches Museum one of the most important museums of science and technology anywhere in the world.

The two-seat Taube ('pigeon') was designed in Austria by Igo Etrich. Thanks to its wing planform, it combined excellent stability with good handling qualities and was a popular training aircraft in the period up to 1914.  The aircraft on display was the winner of the 'Reliability Flight' and the 'Kathreiner Prize' for a flight from Munich to Berlin in 1911, flown by Helmuth Hirth. He completed the 540 km flight in six hours, excluding fuel stops. This was faster than the railway, until then the fastest means of transport.

The two-seat Taube (‘pigeon’) was designed in Austria by Igo Etrich. Thanks to its wing planform, it combined excellent stability with good handling qualities and was a popular training aircraft in the period up to 1914. The aircraft on display in the museum was the winner of the ‘Reliability Flight’ and the ‘Kathreiner Prize’ for a flight from Munich to Berlin in 1911, flown by Helmuth Hirth. He completed the 540 km flight in six hours, excluding fuel stops. This was faster than the railway, until then the fastest means of transport.

6. The European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN) in Meyrin, Switzerland

The name CERN is derived from the acronym for the French “Conseil Européen pour la Recherche Nucléaire”, or European Council for Nuclear Research, a provisional body founded in 1952 with the mandate of establishing a world-class fundamental physics research organization in Europe. At that time, pure physics research concentrated on understanding the inside of the atom, hence the word “nuclear”.

Today, our understanding of matter goes much deeper than the nucleus, and CERN’s main area of research is particle physics – the study of the fundamental constituents of matter and the forces acting between them. Because of this, the laboratory operated by CERN is often referred to as the European Laboratory for Particle Physics. For more information on the guided tours, click here.

FLI Evidence CERN_blau_01

The entire Universe is made up of particles. But where do they come from? What laws govern their behaviour? The purpose of the “Universe of particles” exhibition is for visitors to confront the great questions of contemporary physics, currently being explored by the CERN via the LHC (Large Hadron Collider) and other accelerators.

7. The Titan Missile Museum in Green Valley, Ariz., USA

The Titan Missile Museum showcases the dramatic vestiges of the Cold War between the U.S. and former Soviet Union and provides a vivid education about the history of nuclear conflict-a history of keeping the peace.

FLI Evidence Titan

The museum, a preserved Titan II missile site, officially known as complex 571-7, is all that remains of the 54 Titan II missile sites that were on alert across the United States from 1963 to 1987. Able to launch from its underground silo in just 58 seconds, the Titan II was capable of delivering a 9-megaton nuclear warhead to targets more than 6300 miles (10,000 km) away in about 30 minutes. What was once one of America’s most top secret places is now a National Historic Landmark.

8. La Cité Des Sciences de l’Industrie in Paris, France

This science museum is not only the largest in Europe, but features La Géode, a spherical theater that faces the museum and its reflecting pools. Do take time to explore the website, as it is difficult to manouvre and is not as explanatory as could be.

FLI Evidence Geode

La Géode was built in 1985. It is an architectural work of art besides being a very special movie and events theatre equipped with state-of-theart technical facilities. This design was an absolute technological challenge for architect Adrien Fainsilber and engineer Félix Chamayou. It took them two years to complete the construction. La Géode is a classified monument.

9. The Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium in Okinawa, Japan

The Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium is one of the largest in the world. Its main tank, the Kuroshio Sea houses many different sea creatures, including whale sharks.

FLI Evidence Okinawa

Up until now, captive reproduction of whale sharks has been fraught with difficulties. However, at Okinawa Churaumi Aquarium, multiple captivity will be undertaken in the world class aquarium tank, aimed at captive reproduction of the whale shark species.

10. The American Museum of Natural History, New York, N.Y., USA

Located in the Upper West Side of Manhattan, the American Museum of Natural History is the largest natural history museum in the world, covering four city blocks.

FLI Evidence hall-of-saurischian-dinosaurs

The American Museum of Natural History is especially popular for its wide collection of dinosaur fossils, so don’t go home without visiting the 4th- floor dinosaur exhibits (where you’ll find the incredible “dinosaur mummy”). While there, also be sure to check out the Warren mastodon. This elephant-like mastodon skeleton was the first complete mastodon skeleton found in the U.S. and was discovered in Newburgh, New York in 1845 in the position in which it had died 11,000 years ago.

11. Thomas Edison National Historic Park, West Orange, N.J., USA

In 1886, Thomas Edison purchased a 29-room Queen Anne-style mansion in West Orange, N.J. and a year later, he built a laboratory complex where he worked on his motion picture camera, phonograph and storage battery.

FLI Evidence Thomas Edison

The National Park Service now maintains Edison’s estate and visitors can explore Edison’s private lab, his three-story library, his chemistry lab, his precision machine shop and his mansion where he and his wife raised their kids.

12. Chernobyl, in Ukraine

On April 26, 1986, reactor number four at the Chernobyl power plant exploded, leading to the worst nuclear disaster in history. Pripyat, the town outside Chernobyl that was supposed to be a model of the modern Soviet state, was home to 50,000 residents who had to evacuate, leaving their whole lives behind. The area within the 30-mile exclusion zone will be uninhabitable for the next 20,000 years. For travel arrangements, click here.

FLI Evidence Chernobyl

Twenty years after the accident, Chernobyl started to take on a new life, with the area opening to tourism for the first time. Visitors can tour the ruins of Pripyat, which in a little more than a quarter century has been crumbled away, overtaken by nature and wildlife. There are also a number of abandoned villages within the exclusion zone, some of which are still inhabited, albeit illegally. And of course, there are the remains of the power plant itself.

13. Aurora Borealis, Alaska, Norway, Canada

Alaska, Norway, Canada and other areas above the Arctic Circle might not be as warm as the Galapagos Islands. But tourists willing to bundle up have the opportunity to witness a spectacle unlike anything you might encounter on any tropical trip: the aurora borealis, also known as the Northern Lights.

Those willing to brave the likely subzero temperatures that will greet them will be treated to a somewhat eerie light show in the sky, created by agitated particles high in the Earth’s atmosphere that were released by the sun.

Northern Light

In northern latitudes, the effect is known as the aurora borealis (or the northern lights), named after the Roman goddess of dawn, Aurora, and the Greek name for the north wind, Boreas, by Galileo in 1619.

14. Galapagos Islands, archipelago of islands belonging to Ecuador in the eastern Pacific Ocean

The Galápagos archipelago is world-renowned for its unique and fearless wildlife– much of which was inspiration for Charles Darwin’s Theory of Natural Selection. The islands are therefore very popular amongst natural historians, both professional and amateur.

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The Galápagos were claimed by newly-independent Ecuador in 1832, a mere three years before Darwin’s visit on the Beagle. During the 19th and early 20th centuries, the islands were inhabited by very few settlers and were used as a penal colony, the last closing in 1959 when the islands were declared a national park. The Galapagos were subsequently listed as a World Heritage Site in 1978.

 

This article was derived from destination suggestions by Hannah Gregg, a Buzzfeed User, Discovery News, Fox News, Wikipedia Travel. More information on The 7R Future Leadership Institute contact:
Secretariat:
charuta.vaidhyanathan (at) impactroom.com
Gert Van Mol Office:
gertvanmol (at) impactroom.com

 

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